Resist – The Resistance Series Book Two By Tracy Lawson

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Spoilers!

 

“…[the OCSD] is a modern Leviathan, and if people aren’t afraid of it, they should be. It squanders the fruits of the labors of others to remind us of its power. We are forced to bow before it and accept the crumbs it offers.” 

 

Resist, the second installment of The Resistance series, picks up right where book one, Counteract, left off. The country has been on lockdown for decades after the Office of Civilian Safety and Defense (our villain) was established to protect the people from ongoing waves of terrorist attacks. At least that’s what the OCSD tells the public. The masses sheepishly go along with endless restrictions and are willingly drugged to “stay safe” from terrorist use of chemical weapons. Life is now one long acid trip. The director of the OCSD is poisoned and Careen (our heroine), and her cohorts are blamed.

 

Cue The Resistance!

 

A new OCSD director, Dr. Madalyn Davies, is put in place, this one even more power hungry than the last. The Resistance fights the system by rallying the public to their side. Peacefully and successfully at first. But when Davies makes drugging and controlling the public again a priority over feeding them, all Hell breaks loose. There are riots and looting and innocent people die. In response, the Resistance sprinters off and makes countless mistakes, because they, “have to do something”. This tactic doesn’t end well. With the evil government agency breathing down their collective neck, how will Careen and the Resistance continue to fight?

 

Resist is a great story. Sometimes, important things happen with little or no pomp, so you have to pay close attention to what you’re reading. Resist pulls the reader in with a dose of tense action. But for me, when reading a book, it’s all about the ending. I felt defeat and disappointment at the end of the book. But that’s because I was finally throughly invested in the main characters. And I’m dying to read book three.

 

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Tracy Lawson is an award-winning author of two nonfiction books. She’s enjoyed creating the characters Tommy and Careen and looks forward to continuing their story in more volumes of The Resistance Series young adult novels. Tracy lives in Dallas with her husband, daughter and three spoiled cats.

Anne

I'm a mother of 2 who likes to get involved in too much! Besides writing here I started a non-profit, I'm on the PTO board, very active in my community and volunteer in the school. I enjoy music, reading, cooking, traveling and spending time with my family. We just adopted our 3rd cat and love them all!

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Anne

I'm a mother of 2 who likes to get involved in too much! Besides writing here I started a non-profit, I'm on the PTO board, very active in my community and volunteer in the school. I enjoy music, reading, cooking, traveling and spending time with my family. We just adopted our 3rd cat and love them all!

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Anne

I'm a mother of 2 who likes to get involved in too much! Besides writing here I started a non-profit, I'm on the PTO board, very active in my community and volunteer in the school. I enjoy music, reading, cooking, traveling and spending time with my family. We just adopted our 3rd cat and love them all!

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Let’s Teach…Compassion

Please welcome ABIGAIL LEVRINI, PHD with this Guest Post

 

 

Let’s Teach…compassion.

Greetings, moms (and dads!) Welcome to my blog series called “Let’s Teach”. Each entry will focus on real life examples to illustrate the importance of lessons from the field of psychology, like increasing our own and our children’s’ self-esteem, understanding, or compassion for others.
Today, let’s teach…compassion.
Whether you realize it or not, nearly 1 in 5 Americans suffer with a mental illness. Your children attend school with peers struggling with a variety of issues from ADHD and learning disorders, to depression or anxiety. You work with these people. They’re your neighbors, your mailman, or your Publix cashier. They might even be you. Mental illness is, just like physical illness, a normal part of human life.
One common thread to many of these diagnoses, is the effect they have on an important American ideal – “motivation”. Simply put, they zap it. And sadly, most people on the outside have little understanding or tolerance for the fact that the inability to power through mental illness isn’t a choice. The idea that makes my heart sink the most when it comes to individuals with mental health diagnoses like ADHD, depression, or other disorders that often affect one’s motivation is that people could overcome their problems if they just mustered up enough “willpower”. Ugh. Even with all of our knowledge, I continuously hear reports from parents, teachers, spouses…even my clients themselves…saying, “They have done it before so I know they can if they really  want to.”
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If only it were that simple. Remember the commercial from the 2000s for one of the early depression meds where the little rock is being followed around by the gloomy rain cloud? Well, picture that rock as a brain, and that cloud as the disorder. That is what it is like for people suffering. Just like a cloud, some areas are denser than others, and there are even parts where you can almost see the sun shining through. These are the moments when the affected person can motivate him or her self enough to attend to their responsibilities. There are good days and bad days. And the bad days have nothing to do with laziness or lack of willpower.

One thing that I think makes it hard for people to really get this…I mean truly get it…is that individuals with mental health disorders don’t have the benefit of others seeing their cloud. As difficult as I am sure life is for someone with a more visible handicap, one thing they have in their favor is the fact that it is visible. When we see someone approaching an entrance on crutches, we hold the door for them (at least we  should). On the other hand, if we smile politely at someone who is depressed and they frown and avert their eyes, we assume they are rude and maybe mumble something under our breath. If an ADHD child who turned their homework in the day before doesn’t the following day, we assume he is being defiant.  Children make fun of the “weird” kid struggling with Autism or social skills deficits causing him to become more angry and defiant…and we have all seen in the news where this can so often lead.

I admit I am guilty of this too. I automatically have sympathy and respect for any client that walks into my office, but in my daily life I make assumptions about people’s character flaws when I really have no idea what is going on under the surface. It’s human nature.

So please, try and take a step back now and then when you feel yourself getting impatient with a loved one or stranger who appears to be rude, defiant, or angry. They may be suffering more than you will ever know, and most likely feel ten times the negative feelings toward themselves that you feel. Let’s do better for our community and our children’s futures. Take solace and celebrate the fact that you are mentally healthy and spread those positive feelings around, and  ‘let’s teach’ our children to do the same.

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ABIGAIL LEVRINI, PHD is a licensed clinical psychologist, ADHD specialist, renowned speaker, and bestselling author.  Dr. Levrini has published numerous scientific articles on ADHD and presents her coaching model in  professional settings throughout the country. Dr. Levrini can be found throughout the media on WebMD, The Washington  Post, NAMI, APA, PsychCentral, and many other popular means of press. Dr.  Levrini’s first book is an American Psychological Association (APA) bestseller,  (“Succeeding with Adult ADHD: Daily Strategies to Help you Achieve Your  Goals and Manage Your Life”).  Her second book was published in June of 2015 and is titled, “ADHD Coaching: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals”. Dr. Levrini also stars in the American Psychological Association’s Therapy Video Series on  Adult ADHD  Treatment. Her practice, Psych Ed Connections (www.psychedconnections.com), has locations in Ponte Vedra, FL, Louisville, KY and throughout northern Virginia.
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Anne

I'm a mother of 2 who likes to get involved in too much! Besides writing here I started a non-profit, I'm on the PTO board, very active in my community and volunteer in the school. I enjoy music, reading, cooking, traveling and spending time with my family. We just adopted our 3rd cat and love them all!

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Anne

I'm a mother of 2 who likes to get involved in too much! Besides writing here I started a non-profit, I'm on the PTO board, very active in my community and volunteer in the school. I enjoy music, reading, cooking, traveling and spending time with my family. We just adopted our 3rd cat and love them all!

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